A little history of Seymour, Iowa

Seymour Iowa


Seymour Iowa

     J.C. Fox, Hiram Evans, H.S. Rogers, and Wm. Wade traveled to Chicago in 1870 to convince officials of the Rock Island Railroad to put their railroad line through this area. They offered the company 160 acres if they would come. The railroad came through and Seymour became incorporated in 1871. Several names were suggested and the name was chosen for the chief engineer of the railroad, the Governor or New York as well as Seymour, Indiana.
     By 1905 the town of Seymour had many, many businesses including such things as 3 banks with modern furnishings, a cigar factory, 6 general stores, and 2 telephone systems. 28 trains went through the town daily and the citizens boasted that they had 1 splendid brass band.
       Many of the men worked in the two mines that were located near Seymour. The Sunshine Mine was located southeast of Seymour and the Big Jim Mine was located northeast of town. 200 miners worked 2 shifts and received $1.00 per ton in the winter and $.80 in the summer.
      Seymour continues to have a solid school system that residents support. A new gym and multi-purpose room were built in 1996. The town still has many businesses and churches as well as a medical clinic and care center.
       If you are ever in search of a piece of history, look southeast of Seymour for the Honey War marker. This is one of the markers that designates the boundary between Iowa and Missouri and was court ordered after the land dispute and Missouri wanted to claim our southern tier of counties as their own.
      The Tharp Cemetery, well known as the site where William Clayton penned “Come, Come Ye Saints”, is located south of Seymour.  Visitors who would like to find out more information about the Mormon Trail can check out the Prairie Trails Museum of Wayne County located in Corydon

The first coal mines in Seymour were opened in 1884. In 1902, the Numa Block Coal Company took over these mines. In 1908, "Big Jim", Numa Block number 2 was 1 mile east of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway depot, was the largest coal mine in Appanoose-Wayne Coalfield, able to produce 100,000 tons per year at full capacity. The Mystic coal seam was just over 2 feet thick here, reached by a 202 foot shaft. Numa Block Mine number 3, the Sunshine Mine, was in the southeast part of town, served by the Rock Island, with a 240 foot shaft to the Mystic seam.

Seymour Iowa